Palermo cruise

An ebullient city
A great concentration of sights
A display of Baroque architecture

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Palermo

Traditions, culture and cuisine in Trinacria

A holiday to Italy with MSC Cruises is the perfect chance to visit the regional capital of Sicily. A filthy, bustling, noisy port, Palermo yet holds an unrivalled display of Norman art and architecture and Baroque churches, combined with a warren of medieval streets and markets.

With Sicily’s greatest concentration of sights, and the biggest historic centre in Italy bar Rome, Palermo is a complex, multilayered port that can easily feel overwhelming if you try to do or see too much in one Mediterranean cruise visit.

The best thing to do here is just to wander as the fancy takes you, sifting through Palermo’s jumbled layers of crumbling architecture, along deserted back alleys, then suddenly emerging in the midst of an ebullient street market.

Select an area (La Kalsa, or the sprawling markets of Ballarò), and enjoy your cruise excursion.

Across Via Maqueda is Piazza Pretoria, floodlit at night to highlight the nude figures of its great central fountain, with its racy sixteenth-century Florentine design. The piazza also holds the restored town hall, while towering above both square and fountain is the massive flank of Santa Caterina, Sicilian Baroque at its most exuberant, every inch of the enormous interior covered in a wildly decorative relief-work.

On the south of the island, a couple of kilometres below modern Agrigento, a series of Doric temples – the most captivating of Sicilian Greek remains and a grouping unique outside Greece – are strung out along a ridge facing the sea. Greek colonists surrounded it with a mighty wall, formed in part by a higher ridge on which stood the acropolis. The southern limit of the ancient city was a second, lower ridge and in the fifth century BC it was here, in the “Valle dei Templi”, that the city architects erected their sacred buildings.

Must see places in Palermo

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    Reach the port

    Port of Palermo

    This section contains information on how to reach the port.

    Cruise Terminal:

    Stazione Marittima - Dock Vittorio Veneto

    Reach the port by

    • Car

      From the A19 motorway (Messina), take the last exit and follow the signs for Palermo Port.
      Car

      Parking Information

      PARKING MOLO SANTA LUCIA
       
      • Valet service 
      • Reach the luggage drop off zone of the cruise terminal where you'll find the staff of the parking
      Book your parking with MSC

      park_and_cruise_logo

      VEHICLE DAYS RATES
      Car 8 € 75,00
      Suv 8 € 75,00
      Minivan 8 € 75,00
    • Train

      Palermo Stazione Centrale
      There is a taxi service provided by Trinacria Service that takes just 10 minutes to drive you to the port depending on the traffic.
      Train
    • Plane

      Palermo‘s Falcone-Borsellino Airport is within easy reach of the port by taxi (Trinacria Service taking approximately 40 minutes depending on the traffic) or bus (Prestià e Comandè service).
      Plane

    Italy

    History, gastronomy and fashion
    History, gastronomy and fashion

    A cruise to Italy is an emotional roller coaster. Rome is a tremendous city quite unlike any other, and in terms of historical sights outstrips everywhere else in the country by some way.
     
    Liguria, the small coastal province along the north-west coast, has long been known as the “Italian Riviera” and is accordingly crowded with sun-seekers for much of the summer.
    In Veneto the main focus of interest is, of course, Venice: a unique city, and every bit as beautiful as its reputation would suggest. Tuscany in central Italy represents perhaps the most commonly perceived image of the country, with its classic rolling countryside and the art-packed towns of Florence and Pisa.

    The south proper begins with the region of Campania. Its capital, Naples, is a unique, unforgettable city, the spiritual heart of the Italian south. Puglia, the “heel” of Italy, has underrated pleasures, too, notably the landscape of its Gargano peninsula and the souk-like qualities of its capital, Bari.

    As for Sicily, the island is really a place apart, with a wide mixture of attractions ranging from some of the finest preserved Hellenistic treasures in Europe, to a couple of Italy’s most appealing Mediterranean beach resorts in Taormina and Cefalù, not to mention some gorgeous upland scenery.